Making adult friends

Duration: 9min 50sec Views: 1764 Submitted: 13.01.2020
Category: School
Striking up friendships can be tricky — and studies show millions of us are lonely. Here, four people who forged new connections explain how they did it. Plus: psychologist Linda Blair gives her tips. Teenage years are filled with friendships easily made and some easily forgotten , when you are feeling keen, sociable and energetic. Then there are engagements, marriage, relocation, career changes, families: life comes calling with its multiple demands, and friendships evolve as a result. I have been happy to see my friends move through these huge life moments, but as much as I value my friendships, I have found myself lonely at times.

15 People Share How They *Actually* Made New Friends as an Adult

How to Make Friends as an Adult

Remember how easy it was to make friends in elementary school? Most of the time your best friends ended up being the kids in your class or in your neighborhood. Or maybe you were best friends with kids whose parents were friends with yours. As a child, making friends wasn't as complicated as it feels today. Not only were you less worried about being rejected; you also weren't as picky about who you were hanging out with. But things have changed now that you are a grown-up.

How to Make Friends as an Adult

As a kid, friendships happened naturally. It was as easy as being in the same class or playing the same sport. Those childhood bonds formed effortlessly and sometimes lasted years. But as an adult, making new friends is a lot harder. However, studies show that close friendships are important to your happiness and can even extend your life.
Things were so much easier when we were kids, including making friends. Back when saving for retirement and anti-aging creams were in the very distant future, maybe you didn't give much thought to chatting up your peers at the playground. But, now that socializing is probably at the bottom of your long list of priorities, you might be wondering how you'd even make friends as an adult in the first place, or why you should bother. Beyond having a close-knit group of people to vent about your problems with, or to accompany you on your next girls' trip , maintaining human, interpersonal relationships can significantly impact your physical and mental health.